Games you're proud of

Traditional chess games and chess topics in general

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Graham Banks
Posts: 31203
Joined: Sun Feb 26, 2006 9:52 am
Location: Auckland, NZ

Games you're proud of

Post by Graham Banks » Wed Mar 21, 2018 10:11 am

I'll start.

[pgn][Event "NZ-AUS"]
[Site "corr"]
[Date "1993.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Banks, Graham B. (NZL)"]
[Black "Lawley"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "B03"]
[PlyCount "53"]
[EventDate "1993.??.??"]
[Source "Chess Mail Ltd."]
[SourceDate "2003.04.28"]

1. e4 Nf6 2. e5 Nd5 3. d4 d6 4. c4 Nb6 5. f4 dxe5 6. fxe5 Nc6 7. Be3 Bf5 8. Nc3
e6 9. Nf3 Be7 10. d5 exd5 11. cxd5 Nb4 12. Nd4 Qd7 13. a3 N4xd5 14. Nxd5 Qxd5
15. Nxf5 Qxe5 16. Qf3 O-O-O 17. Be2 Qa5+ 18. Kf2 Bf6 19. Rac1 Bxb2 20. Rc5 Qxa3
21. Ne7+ Kb8 22. Nc6+ bxc6 23. Qxc6 Rd7 24. Bf3 Qa6 25. Rd1 Rhd8 26. Ra5 Qc8
27. Rb5 1-0[/pgn]
My email addresses:
gbanksnz at gmail.com
gbanksnz at yahoo.co.nz

FICGS
Posts: 12
Joined: Wed Mar 13, 2013 6:20 pm
Contact:

Re: Games you're proud of

Post by FICGS » Mon Mar 26, 2018 8:15 pm

Hi Graham,

I'll go with this one... just finished.

http://www.ficgs.com/game_101545.html

What is funny is that I pushed the "resign" button after Kf2 before changing my mind, just to see the end... then win (luckily, probably)
Play chess online on the FICGS applications & website - Correspondence chess tournaments & championship

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Graham Banks
Posts: 31203
Joined: Sun Feb 26, 2006 9:52 am
Location: Auckland, NZ

Re: Games you're proud of

Post by Graham Banks » Mon Mar 26, 2018 8:31 pm

FICGS wrote:Hi Graham,

I'll go with this one... just finished.

http://www.ficgs.com/game_101545.html

What is funny is that I pushed the "resign" button after Kf2 before changing my mind, just to see the end... then win (luckily, probably)
It's always satisfying to win quickly. :)
My email addresses:
gbanksnz at gmail.com
gbanksnz at yahoo.co.nz

FICGS
Posts: 12
Joined: Wed Mar 13, 2013 6:20 pm
Contact:

Re: Games you're proud of

Post by FICGS » Mon Mar 26, 2018 8:34 pm

Not so quickly... but surprisingly, yes ^^
Play chess online on the FICGS applications & website - Correspondence chess tournaments & championship

duncan
Posts: 7647
Joined: Mon Jul 07, 2008 8:50 pm

Re: Games you're proud of

Post by duncan » Mon Apr 23, 2018 10:51 pm

Graham Banks wrote:I'll start.

[pgn][Event "NZ-AUS"]
[Site "corr"]
[Date "1993.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Banks, Graham B. (NZL)"]
[Black "Lawley"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "B03"]
[PlyCount "53"]
[EventDate "1993.??.??"]
[Source "Chess Mail Ltd."]
[SourceDate "2003.04.28"]

1. e4 Nf6 2. e5 Nd5 3. d4 d6 4. c4 Nb6 5. f4 dxe5 6. fxe5 Nc6 7. Be3 Bf5 8. Nc3
e6 9. Nf3 Be7 10. d5 exd5 11. cxd5 Nb4 12. Nd4 Qd7 13. a3 N4xd5 14. Nxd5 Qxd5
15. Nxf5 Qxe5 16. Qf3 O-O-O 17. Be2 Qa5+ 18. Kf2 Bf6 19. Rac1 Bxb2 20. Rc5 Qxa3
21. Ne7+ Kb8 22. Nc6+ bxc6 23. Qxc6 Rd7 24. Bf3 Qa6 25. Rd1 Rhd8 26. Ra5 Qc8
27. Rb5 1-0[/pgn]
Ra5 clever move. what is your elo ?

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Graham Banks
Posts: 31203
Joined: Sun Feb 26, 2006 9:52 am
Location: Auckland, NZ

Re: Games you're proud of

Post by Graham Banks » Tue May 08, 2018 8:48 am

duncan wrote:
Mon Apr 23, 2018 10:51 pm
Graham Banks wrote:I'll start.

[pgn][Event "NZ-AUS"]
[Site "corr"]
[Date "1993.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Banks, Graham B. (NZL)"]
[Black "Lawley"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "B03"]
[PlyCount "53"]
[EventDate "1993.??.??"]
[Source "Chess Mail Ltd."]
[SourceDate "2003.04.28"]

1. e4 Nf6 2. e5 Nd5 3. d4 d6 4. c4 Nb6 5. f4 dxe5 6. fxe5 Nc6 7. Be3 Bf5 8. Nc3
e6 9. Nf3 Be7 10. d5 exd5 11. cxd5 Nb4 12. Nd4 Qd7 13. a3 N4xd5 14. Nxd5 Qxd5
15. Nxf5 Qxe5 16. Qf3 O-O-O 17. Be2 Qa5+ 18. Kf2 Bf6 19. Rac1 Bxb2 20. Rc5 Qxa3
21. Ne7+ Kb8 22. Nc6+ bxc6 23. Qxc6 Rd7 24. Bf3 Qa6 25. Rd1 Rhd8 26. Ra5 Qc8
27. Rb5 1-0[/pgn]
Ra5 clever move. what is your elo ?
In correspondence play, close to 2400.
My email addresses:
gbanksnz at gmail.com
gbanksnz at yahoo.co.nz

duncan
Posts: 7647
Joined: Mon Jul 07, 2008 8:50 pm

Re: Games you're proud of

Post by duncan » Tue May 08, 2018 9:37 am

thanks

Henk
Posts: 5248
Joined: Mon May 27, 2013 8:31 am

Re: Games you're proud of

Post by Henk » Fri May 25, 2018 10:55 am

Bad game but last part of game has a nice combination. I found it because I read it from face of strong player (Elo 2100-2200) watching the game.
For I thought my position was hopeless. But if a strong player finds it interesting then probably there would be something interesting.
Otherwise I probably would have spent less time and not found the winning combination.

So I don't understand why other players are allowed to watch a game. For they usually don't have a perfect poker face. And even if they have a poker face the time they stay watching the game already gives information.

[PGN]
[Event "Internal competition"]
[Site "HP"]
[Date "2017.05.22"]
[Round "-"]
[White "Jan Willem"]
[Black "Henk"]
[Result "0-1"]

1. c4 d6 2. g3 c6 3. Nc3 Nd7 4. Bg2 g6 5. e4 Bg7 6. Nge2 Ne5 7. d3 Bg4 8.
h3 Bf3 9. O-O Nf6 10. Bxf3 Nxf3+ 11. Kg2 Ne5 12. f4 Ned7 13. Be3 e6 14. g4
h5 15. Ng3 hxg4 16. hxg4 Rh4 17. g5 Ng4 18. Bg1 Rh2+ 19. Kf3 Nde5+ 20. fxe5
Nxe5+ 21. Kf4 Qxg5+ 22. Kxg5 Bh6+
*
[/PGN]

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mhull
Posts: 11484
Joined: Wed Mar 08, 2006 8:02 pm
Location: Dallas, Texas
Full name: Matthew Hull

Re: Games you're proud of

Post by mhull » Fri May 25, 2018 4:03 pm

Henk wrote:
Fri May 25, 2018 10:55 am
Bad game but last part of game has a nice combination. I found it because I read it from face of strong player (Elo 2100-2200) watching the game.
For I thought my position was hopeless. But if a strong player finds it interesting then probably there would be something interesting.
Otherwise I probably would have spent less time and not found the winning combination.

So I don't understand why other players are allowed to watch a game. For they usually don't have a perfect poker face. And even if they have a poker face the time they stay watching the game already gives information.

[PGN][Event "Internal competition"]
[Site "HP"]
[Date "2017.05.22"]
[Round "-"]
[White "Jan Willem"]
[Black "Henk"]
[Result "0-1"]

1. c4 d6 2. g3 c6 3. Nc3 Nd7 4. Bg2 g6 5. e4 Bg7 6. Nge2 Ne5 7. d3 Bg4 8.
h3 Bf3 9. O-O Nf6 10. Bxf3 Nxf3+ 11. Kg2 Ne5 12. f4 Ned7 13. Be3 e6 14. g4
h5 15. Ng3 hxg4 16. hxg4 Rh4 17. g5 Ng4 18. Bg1 Rh2+ 19. Kf3 Nde5+ 20. fxe5
Nxe5+ 21. Kf4 Qxg5+ 22. Kxg5 Bh6+*[/PGN]
This is why in-person tournaments are so much more enjoyable. The human factors are endlessly fascinating (IMO) which adds so much to the enjoyment of the game, just as your example testifies. You can learn as much or more about people and human nature as you can about chess.
Matthew Hull

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Harvey Williamson
Posts: 1759
Joined: Sun May 25, 2008 9:12 pm
Location: Media City, UK
Contact:

Re: Games you're proud of

Post by Harvey Williamson » Mon Jun 04, 2018 12:35 pm

This is one of my early correspondence games I am very proud of against a player ranked 2700. Analysis is by IM Gary Lane


[Event "British Correspondence Chess Society"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "2002.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Williamson, Harvey"]
[Black "Overton, David"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "B21"]
[WhiteElo ""]
[BlackElo ""]
[Annotator "Gary Lane"]
[PlyCount "71"]
[EventDate "2002.??.??"]
[Source "ChessPublishing"]
[SourceDate ""]

1. e4 c5 2. d4 cxd4 3. c3 dxc3 4. Nxc3 Nc6 5. Nf3 d6 6. Bc4 a6 7. O-O Nf6 {
Black is behind in development.} 8. b4 {I highly recommend this move for
correspondence games. This is because most players will use a computer
although they tend to say it is only to avoid blunders. However, I suspect a
few who have limited time to study will also use it in the opening.
Consequently, Black will assume he is doing well here because the computer
does not take into account the long-term benefits of the pawn sacrifice in the
Morra such as active piece play and attacking opportunities. Also someone
using a computer will think he is doing well when suddenly the silicon monster
will realise what is going on by abruptly changing the assessment.} Bg4 {
It makes sense to pin the king's knight to reduce White's attackingopportunitie
s.} (8... Nxb4 9. Bxf7+ ({Or} 9. Qb3 e6 $1 10. Qxb4 d5 {
and Black gets his piece back.}) 9... Kxf7 10. Qb3+ e6 11. Qxb4 d5 12. Qd4) 9.
b5 Bxf3 (9... axb5 10. Bxb5 g6 11. e5 $6 {A tempting move but it is always
going to be a risky business to enter an ending a pawn down} ({I prefer} 11.
Bb2 $5 {when} Bg7 12. Nd5 {gives White decent compensation for the pawn}) 11...
dxe5 12. Qxd8+ Rxd8 13. Nxe5 Bd7 14. Nxd7 Rxd7 15. Rb1 Bg7 16. Re1 O-O 17. Na4
Nd5 18. Nc5 ({Or} 18. Rd1 $5 e6 19. Bc4 Nce7 {
makes Black work harder for victory}) 18... Rc7 19. Ne4 Nd4 20. Bd3 f5 21. Nd2
(21. Ng3 {has the merit of covering the e2 square to avoid the tactic which
occurs a few moves later but Black remains on top due to the extra pawn}) 21...
Nc3 22. Rb4 Nce2+ $3 {A clever trick which unveils the rook on the c-file with
deadly consequences for White.} 23. Rxe2 {
the rook is successfully deflected from the defence of the dark-squared bishop}
({Or} 23. Bxe2 Nxe2+ 24. Rxe2 Rxc1+ 25. Nf1 Rd8 {
intending to double along the a-rank winning easily.}) 23... Rxc1+ 24. Nf1
Nxe2+ 25. Bxe2 Rb8 {with a winning position, Reeman,I-May,M/SCCA 2000/}) 10.
gxf3 (10. Qxf3 $2 {is not advisable on account of the fork} Ne5 {
when Black can win material upon} 11. Qe2 Rc8 $1 ({
White survives after the inaccurate} 11... Nxc4 $6 {followed by} 12. Qxc4 Rc8
13. Qd3 {when the queen can protect the knight}) 12. bxa6 bxa6 (12... Nxc4 $6 {
is silly because} 13. axb7 Rc6 14. Rb1 {
gives White some play when he should be resigning}) 13. Bxa6 Rxc3 {
and Black is much better}) 10... axb5 11. Nxb5 $5 {A nice idea of Williamson's
to activate the knight because previous examples had concentrated on pinning
the queen's knight with} (11. Bxb5) 11... Ne5 12. Bb3 e6 {
Black just wants to catch up with development by preparing to castle kingside.}
13. Bg5 (13. Bb2 {is also worth considering to make the most of the knight
being on b5, which allows the dark-squared bishop to have greater influence on
the a1-h8 diagonal}) 13... Nc6 14. Bxf6 (14. Rc1 {
leads to double-edged play after} Ra5 15. a4 Be7 16. Bxf6 gxf6 17. f4) 14...
gxf6 15. f4 Qb6 (15... Ra5 {is met by} 16. a4 {
to support the knight on it's strong outpost}) 16. a4 Na7 17. Nxa7 Rxa7 18. f5
$1 {White gets more space. An excellent move designed to increase the scope of
the light-squared bishop. Black is already in trouble and significantly still
has not caught up with development.} Ke7 19. Kh1 Ra5 20. Rc1 Rc5 (20... exf5
21. Bd5 fxe4 22. Qh5 {leaves Black close to resignation}) 21. Rb1 Qc6 ({
Once again, taking the pawn on f5 leads to ruin upon} 21... exf5 22. Qh5 Kd8
23. Bd5 {wins}) 22. Qd3 (22. Re1 Qd7 23. Qd3 {is also good for White.}) 22...
b6 23. Rfe1 h5 24. fxe6 fxe6 25. f4 Rc3 26. Qd2 Bh6 27. Qg2 Qa8 28. Bd1 Rg8 29.
Qf2 {White intends f5} Rc4 30. Qxb6 Rgc8 31. f5 {The other f-pawn now
continues the theme of undermining the pawn barrier around the stranded black
king.} exf5 32. Bf3 f4 (32... Qxa4 33. exf5+ Kd7 34. Bd5 {and White can give up
}) (32... fxe4 33. Bxe4 $1 {a nice surprise} Rxe4 34. Qb7+ Qxb7 35. Rxb7+ Ke6
36. Rxe4+ Kf5 37. Rh4 Kg6 38. Rd7 {gives White a winning ending.}) 33. Red1 {
Now the threat really is mate in one} R8c6 ({Of course,} 33... Qxa4 $4 {
quickly loses after} 34. Qxd6+ Kf7 35. Bxh5+ Kg8 36. Rg1+ Bg5 37. Qxf6) (33...
Rxa4 $4 34. Qxd6+ Kf7 35. Bxh5+ Kg8 36. Rg1+ Bg5 37. Rxg5+ $1 fxg5 38. Qg6+ Kh8
39. Qh6+ Kg8 40. Qxg5+ Kh7 41. Qg6+ Kh8 42. Qh6+ Kg8 43. Rg1# {mate}) 34. Qg1
Qe8 $6 ({An improvement is} 34... Bg5 $5) 35. a5 $1 Bg5 36. e5 (36. e5 {
Black resigned in view of} dxe5 37. Rb7+ Ke6 38. h4 Bxh4 39. Bd5+ Kf5 40. Bf7 {
winning}) 1-0

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