Chess book recommendations?

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h1a8
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Chess book recommendations?

Post by h1a8 » Tue Aug 11, 2015 3:46 pm

Does anyone recommend the following books for thinking, planning, and position analysis (mostly middle game)?
Reassess your chess 4th edition and My system.

If not, then is there any book(s) out there that is arguably better?


Also, what chess regimens that is best to use to help a chess player go from 1600 to 2000 eloquent in the fastest time, assuming they have 2 hours a day to work on it? I don't mind using software or books.

Thanks!

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mhull
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Re: Chess book recommendations?

Post by mhull » Tue Aug 11, 2015 5:14 pm

h1a8 wrote:Also, what chess regimens that is best to use to help a chess player go from 1600 to 2000 eloquent in the fastest time, assuming they have 2 hours a day to work on it? I don't mind using software or books.

Thanks!
I recommend this book for the C/B player.

The Amateur's Mind: Turning Chess Misconceptions into Chess Mastery by Jeremy Silman
http://www.amazon.com/The-Amateurs-Mind ... 1890085022
Matthew Hull

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michiguel
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Re: Chess book recommendations?

Post by michiguel » Tue Aug 11, 2015 6:51 pm

h1a8 wrote:Does anyone recommend the following books for thinking, planning, and position analysis (mostly middle game)?
Reassess your chess 4th edition and My system.

If not, then is there any book(s) out there that is arguably better?


Also, what chess regimens that is best to use to help a chess player go from 1600 to 2000 eloquent in the fastest time, assuming they have 2 hours a day to work on it? I don't mind using software or books.

Thanks!
If you know Spanish, the answer is a no-brainer:
Robero Grau's General Treatise of Chess
http://www.amazon.com/Tratado-General-A ... to+G.+Grau

(Read the reviews)
It is really a crime that it has not been translated (as far as I know). I have not seen anything like it.

The Jeremy Silman book is really good.

Miguel

S.Taylor
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Re: Chess book recommendations?

Post by S.Taylor » Wed Aug 12, 2015 11:25 am

h1a8 wrote:Does anyone recommend the following books for thinking, planning, and position analysis (mostly middle game)?
Reassess your chess 4th edition and My system.

If not, then is there any book(s) out there that is arguably better?


Also, what chess regimens that is best to use to help a chess player go from 1600 to 2000 eloquent in the fastest time, assuming they have 2 hours a day to work on it? I don't mind using software or books.

Thanks!
Reassess your chess might be great. I once asked about it here and someone said it is only of value to someone who who studied the original work (my system) in depth. But i'm not sure if that is true. Maybe it's good without that.

But i have a new book which is so great that i think it could make an intelligent person into world champion level material, if he would study it well.
And that is "Best Play" by Alexander Shashin.

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Re: Chess book recommendations?

Post by Dr. Axel Schumacher » Wed Aug 12, 2015 12:09 pm

h1a8 wrote:Does anyone recommend the following books for thinking, planning, and position analysis (mostly middle game)?
Reassess your chess 4th edition and My system.

If not, then is there any book(s) out there that is arguably better?

Also, what chess regimens that is best to use to help a chess player go from 1600 to 2000 eloquent in the fastest time, assuming they have 2 hours a day to work on it? I don't mind using software or books.

Thanks!
Both are good books; I can recommend more:

There are several books from or about famous chess grandmasters that are regularly recommended by chess scholars. In early 2013 I started a thorough internet search and made a survey among chess grandmasters and other strong experts to find out which books are most suitable for young/medium level players to learn from the masters. The result is this TOP 12 list of the best books ever published in this category:

1. Aaron Nimzowitsch “My System”
Written by a living, witty and figurative language, this is probably THE classic chess book of all time and suggested reading of many outstanding players past and present. It is a brilliant textbook focused on positional play. Not to have read this masterpiece is regarded as a serious gap in a chess player’s education. Nimzowitschs ideas about how to play chess have had a profound influence on modern chess thinking.

2. David Bronstein “Zurich International Chess Tournament 1953”
Simply one of the greatest chess books ever written. Bronstein, a Soviet grandmaster and known chess analyst commented the games of this tournament that was one of the most meaningful in the postwar years. The book contains annotations by Bronstein of all 210 games played by players such as Smyslov, Bronstein, Keres, Reshevsky, Euwe or Petrosian. The book is easily understood with any level of chess strength and describes the events and the atmosphere of the chess struggle for access to the world chess domination; a chess confrontation between the Western and Soviet chess schools. A MUST READ.

3. John Nunn “Understanding Chess Move by Move”
Nunn selected thirty instructive games by top players to explain the most important chess principles. Virtually every move is commented in detail in order to show how the best players succeed. This book is well suited for an intermediate and experienced chess player who had already gone through books for beginners. The author does expect the reader to have basic knowledge, focusing on what a good player really needs to know to get getter.

4. Garry Kasparov “My Great Predecessors” Series

Many claim that this series, which consists of 5 volumes, is undoubtedly the major chess work of recent times. The books are about the players who preceded Kasparov in being official World Champions and they cover also "hot spots" of chess history – critical moments of the matches played at the World Championships.

5. Mihail Marin “Learn from the legends”
With excellent narrative and detailed analysis Romanian GM Marin examines and explains in a personal and sympathetic style the contribution from eight of the chess legends that influenced him most in his own development: Rubinstein, Alekhine, Botvinnik, Tal, Petrosian, Fischer, Karpov and Korchnoi. Giving solid analysis, he makes clear what is important about these players and their games and why their technique was so effective.

6. Mikhail Tal “Tal vs Botvinnik 1960”
This is likely the best book written about a world championship match by a contestant. Tal explains thoroughly every one of the 21 games, telling both the on- and off-the-board story of one of the most dramatic and celebrated world championship matches of all time. The book helps to look "inside Tal’s head" as he discusses not just the moves, but moods and psychology of the players.

7. Alexander Alekhine “My Best Games of Chess”
With great clarity, Alekhine comments his best games from 1909-1937, clearly explaining the most complex and difficult concepts. Using brilliant and abstract ideas, Alekhine is able to put in plain words very complicated situations on the board. Probably, one of the best ways to improve the chess understanding of a qualified amateur.

8. Mark Dvoretsky “Secrets of Chess Training”
Soviet International Master Dvoretsky gained the fame to be the best chess coach of the world, which is reflected in this book. This classic book is especially informative on the endgame, frequently neglected by players in their early studies. Dvoretskys teachings are based upon his experience of teaching many of the best Grandmasters, including Artur Jusupov and Gary Kasparov.

9. Max Euwe “Chess Master vs. Chess Amateur”
Annotated for intermediate level players, this book gives great insights into the thinking processes of both the master and the amateur. Euwe's book is highly instructive and covers also different opening strategies. The games were selected and annotated to help amateurs learn how to avoid a variety of weak strategic and tactical moves.

10. Alexander Kotov “Think Like a Grandmaster”
In this potentially best selling chess book of all time, former World Championship candidate Kotov unravels the essential techniques of chess mastery. This training manual encourages the Intermediate level player to understand how a grandmaster thinks, and even more important, how he works. Kotov tackles fundamental issues such as knowing how and when to analyze, a selection of candidate moves and the factors of success, focusing on the middlegame.

11 Bobby Fischer “My 60 Memorable Games”
Fischer takes the reader move by move through his most instructive and entertaining games, including the astounding “Game of the Century,” played when he was only 15 years old. This fast, efficient and enjoyable book, gives a true insight into one of the most gifted, troubled, and controversial chess minds of the 20th century. Fischer's annotations are refreshing, bringing his games to life with brutal honesty and humbleness often stating where he made mistakes and how he could have played better, flavored with details that few chess authors would bother to include.

12. Mikhail Botvinnik “Achieving the Aim”

In this fascinating autobiography of the first Soviet world champion, Botvinnik explains his “scientific” approach to the game. The book contains a selection of some of his most crucial games and provides a frank exploration of the life of a chess player in the former USSR.

Best,
Axel
"A child of five would understand this. Send someone to fetch a child of five".
Groucho Marx

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Kirk
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Re: Chess book recommendations?

Post by Kirk » Sun Aug 16, 2015 3:34 pm

h1a8 wrote:Does anyone recommend the following books for thinking, planning, and position analysis (mostly middle game)?
Reassess your chess 4th edition and My system.

If not, then is there any book(s) out there that is arguably better?


Also, what chess regimens that is best to use to help a chess player go from 1600 to 2000 eloquent in the fastest time, assuming they have 2 hours a day to work on it? I don't mind using software or books.

Thanks!
If I could pick only one book it would be 500 Master Games of Chess.

http://store.doverpublications.com/0486232085.html

My second choice would be the Mammoth book of Chess Games games. Most bang for the buck if you will.

http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/8516 ... hess_Games

The Mammoth Book of Chess is good too:

http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/1289 ... am-burgess
“He knew all the tricks, dramatic irony, metaphor, pathos, puns, parody, litotes and... satire. He was vicious”

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Jack Lad
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Re: Chess book recommendations?

Post by Jack Lad » Sun Aug 16, 2015 4:42 pm

Kirk wrote:The Mammoth Book of Chess is good too:
http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/1289 ... am-burgess
I bought that book bran new from a chess tourney many years ago but for half price because the cover was slightly damaged. I recommend it too along with The Complete Chess Addict (I also happen to be acquainted with one of the authors) for shear entertainment but I don't think either will improve your rating that much.
http://www.amazon.co.uk/The-Complete-Ch ... 0571149014
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Even-More-Compl ... 0571170404
Pump Your Rating might help but I don't have it.
http://www.amazon.co.uk/PUMP-YOUR-RATIN ... 1907982736

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Kirk
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Re: Chess book recommendations?

Post by Kirk » Sun Aug 16, 2015 8:12 pm

Jack Lad wrote:
Kirk wrote:The Mammoth Book of Chess is good too:
http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/1289 ... am-burgess
I bought that book bran new from a chess tourney many years ago but for half price because the cover was slightly damaged. I recommend it too along with The Complete Chess Addict (I also happen to be acquainted with one of the authors) for shear entertainment but I don't think either will improve your rating that much.
http://www.amazon.co.uk/The-Complete-Ch ... 0571149014
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Even-More-Compl ... 0571170404
Pump Your Rating might help but I don't have it.
http://www.amazon.co.uk/PUMP-YOUR-RATIN ... 1907982736
I think I remember not paying more than $6 myself for at least 400+ pages, correct? But the Mammoth games one is the better of the two for sure. 500 Master Games can be found for a good price too as most of the Dover books.

While pondering other books I forgot books by Dan Heisman. He has one of the most verbose writing style of any chess author I can think of. Couple of his bookstore "World's Most Instructive Amateur Game Book" and "Everyone's 2nd Chessbook".

I like the style Valeri Beim as well. Excellent book on Paul Morphy!
“He knew all the tricks, dramatic irony, metaphor, pathos, puns, parody, litotes and... satire. He was vicious”

S.Taylor
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Re: Chess book recommendations?

Post by S.Taylor » Mon Aug 17, 2015 5:31 am

1). Mammouth book of chess is perhaps best in world for people with elo of 0-2400+

2). Best Play by Shashin is maybe best in world for people of elo 2000-3000 and even more.

These are my top two reccomendations.

I've seen quite a few in my time.

Look
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Re: Chess book recommendations?

Post by Look » Fri Sep 11, 2015 5:57 am

Hi,

For beginner and then moderate level "My system" ; For advanced level "My 60 memorable games".

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