WCC 2016 thread

Traditional chess games and chess topics in general

Moderators: Dan Honeycutt, Sam Hull, fern

Forum rules
This textbox is used to restore diagrams posted with the [d] tag before the upgrade.
User avatar
AdminX
Posts: 5099
Joined: Mon Mar 13, 2006 1:34 pm
Location: Acworth, GA
Contact:

Re: WCC 2016 thread

Post by AdminX » Wed Nov 16, 2016 4:49 pm

Ras wrote: 2) As soon as the endgame is reached, Carlsen commits more inaccuracies than Karjakin, and Carlsen is not able to turn advantage into win.
I think this will be a very temporary disadvantage for Mangus. Pretty sure he is warming up into form.
"Good decisions come from experience, and experience comes from bad decisions."
__________________________________________________________________
Ted Summers

Vinvin
Posts: 4244
Joined: Thu Mar 09, 2006 8:40 am
Full name: Vincent Lejeune

Re: WCC 2016 thread

Post by Vinvin » Fri Nov 18, 2016 10:29 am

Game 5.
The biggest improvement I found with the help of SF for this game is 43...Rh8 as a lot of analyses points out but it's not easy to find the right continuation.
43. .. Rh8 44. Qe4 Qh6 45. Kf1 Qh1+ 46. Ke2 , here I let SF thinking for 4 hours with the result :

Code: Select all

 53/94    4:12:49    175 847 813k    11 592k    -0,24    46. ... Rg8 47.Rf1 Qg2+ 48.Rf2 Qg1 49.Rf1 Qh2+ 50.Rf2 Qh3 51.Kd3 Qh1 52.Kc2 Qa1 53.Qb4 Rh8 54.Bxg5 Rh1 55.Bd2 Qd1+ 56.Kd3 Rh8 57.Ke3 Rf8 58.Qd4 Bd5 59.Bc3 Qh1 60.Bd2 Qg1 61.Bc3 Rxf3+ 62.Ke2 Rxf2+ 63.Qxf2 Qxg4+ 64.Ke1 Qg8 65.Qd4 Qg5 66.e6 Bxe6 67.Ke2 Bg4+ 68.Kf2 Qf5+ 69.Ke3 Qf3+ 70.Kd2 Qd1+ 71.Ke3 Qe2+ 72.Kf4 Qf3+ 73.Kg5 Qf5+ 74.Kh4 Qh5+ 75.Kg3 Bd1 76.Qh8+ Qxh8 77.Bxh8 Kd7 78.Kf4 Ke6 79.Ke4 Bc2+ 80.Kd4 Bg6 81.Kc4 Kf5 82.Kd4 Bh5 83.Be5 Ke6 84.Bf4 Kf6 85.Ke4 Bg6+ 86.Kd4 Ke6 87.Bd2 Bf5 88.Bc3 Bg4 89.Bd2 Kf6 90.Bc3 Bh5 91.Ke4+ Ke6 92.Kd4 Bf7 93.Ke4
 54/94    4:12:49    175 847 813k    11 592k    -0,96    46. ... Rd8 47.Rf1 Qh4 48.Qc2 Kb8 49.Qc3 Ka7 50.Rf2 Rd5 51.Bd2 Bf7 52.Rg2 Rd7 53.Rf2 Be6 54.Kf1 Rd8 55.Ke2 Bf7 56.Be3 Ka8 57.Bd2 Bg8 58.Rf1 Be6 59.Kd1 Qh7 60.Rf2 Qh1+ 61.Ke2 Qh4 62.Rg2 Bd5 63.Rf2 Bf7 64.Be3 Bg8 65.Qc2 Be6 66.Qc3 Rd5 67.Bd2 Ka7 68.Rg2 Rd7 69.Rf2 Ka8 70.Kf1 Rd8 71.Ke2 Bd5 72.Rf1 Rf8 73.Qd4 Ka7 74.Kd1 Bxf3+ 75.Kc1 Re8
So, only 46... Rd8 fight for the advantage and score rise when going deeper in the mainline. But it would take 1 more hours of analyze (man+computer) to find it's winning or not.

Sean Evans
Posts: 1777
Joined: Thu Jun 05, 2008 8:58 pm
Location: Canada

Re: WCC 2016 thread

Post by Sean Evans » Fri Nov 18, 2016 4:19 pm

KING KRUSHER: World Chess Championship 2016 - Game 5: Magnus Carlsen vs Sergey Karjakin

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xCcMvROwxVc

Sean Evans
Posts: 1777
Joined: Thu Jun 05, 2008 8:58 pm
Location: Canada

Re: WCC 2016 thread

Post by Sean Evans » Sun Nov 20, 2016 10:50 am

World Chess Championship 2016 - Game 6: Sergey Karjakin vs Magnus Carlsen

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2wtY05aIybQ&t=0s

Sean Evans
Posts: 1777
Joined: Thu Jun 05, 2008 8:58 pm
Location: Canada

Re: WCC 2016 thread

Post by Sean Evans » Sun Nov 20, 2016 11:02 am

http://www.bendbulletin.com/opinion/481 ... orld-chess

By Stephen Carter / Bloomberg
Published Nov 20, 2016 at 12:02AM
Does information really want to be free? That’s the question hanging over the world chess championship match being contested this month in New York City. On the board is an exciting battle between Magnus Carlsen of Norway and his challenger, Sergei Karjakin, currently tied at 1½ points each. Off the board is a dreary but important legal battle over who gets to transmit the moves to fans around the globe. Anyone interested in technology and intellectual property should care about the outcome.
Asked to imagine a chess game between two grandmasters, most of us would picture an atmosphere of austere cerebral conflict, each sitting like a stone, chin in hand, neurons firing furiously as they calculate move and countermove. And to some extent that’s what happens. But over years, a nagging question has gone unanswered: Who exactly owns the masterpiece the contestants are creating on the board?
Agon Ltd., the company sponsoring the match, says it does. At least it claims to own the exclusive right to transmit the players’ moves in real time. I should explain that where once chess fans followed major tournaments and matches via newspaper columns or even books published months or years later, nowadays one simply logs into one of the many available sites and watches the game unfold on a virtual board.
But Agon, beginning this year, has insisted upon a legal right to decide who can transmit the moves in real time and who can’t. Its goal is to drive all that internet fan traffic to its own site, where it charges a fee to view the moves as they happen. (Some competing sites offer free access to those who want to view a virtual board or see commentary; others charge for the same service. Only Agon’s site has live video of the match, and no one is disputing the company’s exclusive right to provide and charge for that service.)
Now Agon is again threatening legal action against sites that transmit the moves without the company’s permission. The company has tried this technique before, without much success. So far, the efforts to obtain an injunction have been unavailing. A federal judge told the company that transmitting the moves was “robust reporting” and in the public interest.
Agon, which says it needs to limit transmission by others to break even on the match, may nevertheless sue for damages, and plans an appeal. As a longtime teacher of intellectual property, I don’t think the law is on the company’s side.
The question is whether live transmission of the moves should also be treated as “a common privilege.”
I love chess, and I am quite looking forward to an exciting match between Karjakin, the heavy underdog, and Carlsen, who has yet to lose a championship match. The moves undeniably have value, and I am among hundreds of thousands of chess fans around the world who are following the games live. I entirely understand that if the organizer can’t make money, there might be no match at all. But demand for information is shattering traditional intellectual property barriers. Chess moves are just data. Agon is entitled to make a profit, but not by limiting the flow of information which, after all, just wants to be free.
— Stephen Carter is a columnist for Bloomberg. He is a professor of law at Yale University.
15623938

whereagles
Posts: 558
Joined: Thu Nov 13, 2014 11:03 am

Re: WCC 2016 thread

Post by whereagles » Sun Nov 20, 2016 2:17 pm

Anyone watching the match (live or via site) can broadcast the moves to a pirate server in tuvalu... Agon has zero chance to stop this :P

User avatar
Ponti
Posts: 451
Joined: Wed Mar 15, 2006 5:13 am
Location: Curitiba - PR - BRAZIL
Contact:

Re: WCC 2016 thread

Post by Ponti » Mon Nov 21, 2016 6:14 am

This match is just a matter of how much orange juice Carlsen can drink.

Karjakin's strategy is to draw every game quickly, and decide the WCh in a rapid or blitz match.

Carlsen's strategy is to play every endgame, no matter it is drawish or not, 'till Karjakin gets exausted. Expect many 6-hour boring games...

It's a pitty that Caruana did not make it to be the challenger.
A. Ponti
AMD Ryzen 1800x, Windows 10.
FIDE current ratings: standard 1913, rapid 1931

Vinvin
Posts: 4244
Joined: Thu Mar 09, 2006 8:40 am
Full name: Vincent Lejeune

Re: WCC 2016 thread

Post by Vinvin » Mon Nov 21, 2016 11:55 pm

Game 8.
Karjakin overlooked 37...Qa4! -2.63

From http://analysis.sesse.net/

Score: -2.63

PV: 37. … Qa4 38. Qxb6 Ncd7 39. Qd6 Qb4 40. Nb7 Nb6 41. Qxb4 axb4 42. Na5 Nfd7 43. Nb3 Na4 44. Bc6 Nac5 45. Nd2 Nb6 46. Kg2 b3 47. Kf3 b2 48. Nb1 f5 49. Ke2 Nc4 50. Bb5 Nd6 51. Bc6 Nce4 52. Kd3 Nxg3 53. Kc3 Nf1 54. Kd3 g5 55. fxg5 hxg5 56. Bg2 Ng3 57. Kc2

370,896,017 nodes, 32,109,429 nodes/sec, depth 34 ply (62 selective), 95,166 Syzygy hits

User avatar
AdminX
Posts: 5099
Joined: Mon Mar 13, 2006 1:34 pm
Location: Acworth, GA
Contact:

Re: WCC 2016 thread

Post by AdminX » Tue Nov 22, 2016 9:32 am

Analysis done using Chessbase 14 (Tactical Training) with Komodo 10.2 (5 Minutes Per Move).

[pgn]
[Event "AGON FWCM 2016"]
[Site "New York"]
[Date "2016.11.21"]
[Round "8"]
[White "Carlsen, Magnus"]
[Black "Karjakin, Sergey"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "E14"]
[WhiteElo "2853"]
[BlackElo "2772"]
[Annotator "Tactical Analysis 1.01 (300s)"]
[PlyCount "104"]
[EventDate "2016.??.??"]
[EventType "match"]
[EventCountry "USA"]
[SourceTitle "playchess.com"]
[Source "ChessBase"]

1. d4 Nf6 2. Nf3 d5 3. e3 e6 4. Bd3 c5 5. b3 Be7 6. O-O O-O 7. Bb2 b6 8. dxc5
Bxc5 9. Nbd2 Bb7 10. Qe2 Nbd7 11. c4 {LiveBook: 3 Games} dxc4 $146 ({Relevant:
} 11... Qe7 12. cxd5 Nxd5 13. a3 {1/2-1/2 (13) Kohlweyer,B (2422)-Aloma Vidal,
R (2403) Figueres 2014}) 12. Nxc4 ({Don't play} 12. bxc4 Qc7 $15) 12... Qe7 13.
a3 {White has an edge.} a5 14. Nd4 Rfd8 15. Rfd1 Rac8 16. Rac1 Nf8 17. Qe1 Ng6
18. Bf1 Ng4 19. Nb5 {[%eval -41,27]} (19. Qe2 $11 {[%eval 22,26]} N4e5 20. Nxe5
Nxe5 21. Nb5 Rxd1 22. Rxd1 (22. Qxd1 Rd8 23. Qe2 Nd3 $17)) {[%tqu ]} 19... Bc6
{[%eval 19,30]} (19... Qg5 $1 $15 {[%eval -41,27]} 20. Ncd6 Bxd6 21. Nxd6 N4e5)
20. a4 $11 Bd5 21. Bd4 Bxc4 22. Rxc4 Bxd4 23. Rdxd4 Rxc4 24. bxc4 Nf6 25. Qd2
Rb8 26. g3 Ne5 {[%cal Bg6e5,Be5d7,Bd7c5]} 27. Bg2 h6 28. f4 Ned7 29. Na7 Qa3
30. Nc6 Rf8 31. h3 Nc5 {[%tqu ]} 32. Kh2 $1 Nxa4 33. Rd8 g6 34. Qd4 Kg7 {
[%tqu ]} 35. c5 $2 {[%eval -264,36] [#]} (35. Rd7 $1 $11 {[%eval 0,32]}) 35...
Rxd8 $19 36. Nxd8 Nxc5 {Hoping for ...Qd3.} 37. Qd6 {[%tqu ]} Qd3 $2 {[%eval 0,
44]} ({Black should play} 37... Qa4 $1 $19 {[%eval -241,31] Threatens to win
with ...Qb5.} 38. g4 g5 39. fxg5 hxg5) {[%tqu ]} 38. Nxe6+ $1 $11 fxe6 (38...
Nxe6 39. Qxd3) 39. Qe7+ Kg8 40. Qxf6 a4 {Strongly threatening ...a3.} 41. e4
Qd7 42. Qxg6+ Qg7 43. Qe8+ Qf8 44. Qc6 Qd8 45. f5 a3 46. fxe6 Kg7 {[#] aiming
for ...a2.} 47. e7 Qxe7 {White must now prevent ...a2.} 48. Qxb6 {Black should
prevent Qb4.} Nd3 49. Qa5 Qc5 $36 {Black is pushing.} 50. Qa6 Ne5 51. Qe6 $2 {
[%eval -598,34]} (51. h4 $11 {[%eval -21,33] and White stays safe.}) {[%tqu ]}
51... h5 $1 $19 52. h4 {[%tqu ]} a2 $1 0-1

[/pgn]
"Good decisions come from experience, and experience comes from bad decisions."
__________________________________________________________________
Ted Summers

User avatar
AdminX
Posts: 5099
Joined: Mon Mar 13, 2006 1:34 pm
Location: Acworth, GA
Contact:

Re: WCC 2016 thread

Post by AdminX » Wed Nov 23, 2016 9:40 am

Magnus Carlsen Vs Sergey Karjakin - Press Conference - Game 8 World Chess Championship 2016

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lRN-ek4-2Rk
"Good decisions come from experience, and experience comes from bad decisions."
__________________________________________________________________
Ted Summers

Post Reply