Houdini is getting some wider press. Congratulations!

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hgm
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Re: Houdini is getting some wider press. Congratulations!

Post by hgm » Sun Jan 16, 2011 7:26 pm

gaard wrote:This is just saying that if a crime has been committed, a crime has been committed, but in the case of Houdini nobody has shown that a crime has been committed, let alone under what statue or law.
Apparently some think a crime might have been committed, others don't. Doesn't the word 'controversial' express that? If it a crime was 'shown' to be committed, there wouldn't be much to controverse about, don't you think? :roll:
On the topic of Ippolit and its legal standing, does this look familiar?
disassembling for purposes of finding information is legal and cannot be prevented.

It would be legal (though incredibly hard) for someone to disassemble one of the commercial programs and publish his findings.

Vas
If Vas does not believe Ippolit's legal standing is questionable - which he could not by his own logic that it is legal - why should we condemn Mr. Houdart who took ideas and possibly code from Ippolit?
Well, like I said, "for the purpose of information" is not the same as publishing it. If I buy a book, I am allowed to read it "for the purpose of information". Even if it is in a language that I don't read very well, I am allowed to translate it, or hire a translator to translate it for me. But if I would then start selling that translation, or give it away for free, it would be an infrngement of the copyrights of the original author.

This is all really very elementary legal stuff. Why does everyone seem to have such an incredible difficulty grasping it? :shock:

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Don
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Re: Houdini is getting some wider press. Congratulations!

Post by Don » Sun Jan 16, 2011 7:34 pm

Houdini wrote:
George Tsavdaris wrote:This has become annoying.
I agree.
It's a fascinating study of human nature.

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Re: Houdini is getting some wider press. Congratulations!

Post by bhlangonijr » Sun Jan 16, 2011 9:41 pm

Don wrote: I just don't understand why people attach so much of their own self-worth to an achievement they had nothing to do with. Don't you have something of your own to take pride in?
This is an euphemism for: "Dude, get a life." :lol:

That phenomenon is an interesting side of the human nature. It is very often associated with some level of fanatism as commonly found in some fundamentalist religious people and also in football supporters.

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Don
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Re: Houdini is getting some wider press. Congratulations!

Post by Don » Mon Jan 17, 2011 12:06 am

bhlangonijr wrote:
Don wrote: I just don't understand why people attach so much of their own self-worth to an achievement they had nothing to do with. Don't you have something of your own to take pride in?
This is an euphemism for: "Dude, get a life." :lol:

That phenomenon is an interesting side of the human nature. It is very often associated with some level of fanatism as commonly found in some fundamentalist religious people and also in football supporters.
It's odd that you mention football because I almost included an anecdote about this. Years ago an acquaintance of mine was depressed for about 2 weeks because his football team lost the super bowl. I just can't imagine how such a thing can mean so much to someone who seemed to take the loss as a personal failing on his own part. Had "his" team won he would have been flying high and probably would have felt like he was superior to everyone else for a couple of weeks.

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Re: Houdini is getting some wider press. Congratulations!

Post by gerold » Mon Jan 17, 2011 2:22 pm

Don wrote:
bhlangonijr wrote:
Don wrote: I just don't understand why people attach so much of their own self-worth to an achievement they had nothing to do with. Don't you have something of your own to take pride in?
This is an euphemism for: "Dude, get a life." :lol:

That phenomenon is an interesting side of the human nature. It is very often associated with some level of fanatism as commonly found in some fundamentalist religious people and also in football supporters.
It's odd that you mention football because I almost included an anecdote about this. Years ago an acquaintance of mine was depressed for about 2 weeks because his football team lost the super bowl. I just can't imagine how such a thing can mean so much to someone who seemed to take the loss as a personal failing on his own part. Had "his" team won he would have been flying high and probably would have felt like he was superior to everyone else for a couple of weeks.
May be he bet the family jackpot on the losing team. :)

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Don
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Re: Houdini is getting some wider press. Congratulations!

Post by Don » Mon Jan 17, 2011 2:43 pm

gerold wrote:
Don wrote:
bhlangonijr wrote:
Don wrote: I just don't understand why people attach so much of their own self-worth to an achievement they had nothing to do with. Don't you have something of your own to take pride in?
This is an euphemism for: "Dude, get a life." :lol:

That phenomenon is an interesting side of the human nature. It is very often associated with some level of fanatism as commonly found in some fundamentalist religious people and also in football supporters.
It's odd that you mention football because I almost included an anecdote about this. Years ago an acquaintance of mine was depressed for about 2 weeks because his football team lost the super bowl. I just can't imagine how such a thing can mean so much to someone who seemed to take the loss as a personal failing on his own part. Had "his" team won he would have been flying high and probably would have felt like he was superior to everyone else for a couple of weeks.
May be he bet the family jackpot on the losing team. :)
Good theory, but no, he was just a little out of balance and was always like this. He was one of those guys you can see a mile away that he has low self-esteem.

He was an extreme case but millions of football fanatics get depressed or elated when there team wins and it's very obvious that they are attaching at least a portion of their own personal ego to the team they believe represents there own personal successes and failures. It's sad, because they let the accomplishments of others serve as proxies for their own self-worth - and in most case they don't have a fraction of the talent of the athletes they identify with.

It's like this with the Robbo and Houdini nut-cases too. Low self-esteem, and they attach their loyalties to a winner so that they can feel like a winner.

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Dr.Wael Deeb
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Re: Houdini is getting some wider press. Congratulations!

Post by Dr.Wael Deeb » Mon Jan 17, 2011 2:59 pm

Don wrote:
gerold wrote:
Don wrote:
bhlangonijr wrote:
Don wrote: I just don't understand why people attach so much of their own self-worth to an achievement they had nothing to do with. Don't you have something of your own to take pride in?
This is an euphemism for: "Dude, get a life." :lol:

That phenomenon is an interesting side of the human nature. It is very often associated with some level of fanatism as commonly found in some fundamentalist religious people and also in football supporters.
It's odd that you mention football because I almost included an anecdote about this. Years ago an acquaintance of mine was depressed for about 2 weeks because his football team lost the super bowl. I just can't imagine how such a thing can mean so much to someone who seemed to take the loss as a personal failing on his own part. Had "his" team won he would have been flying high and probably would have felt like he was superior to everyone else for a couple of weeks.
May be he bet the family jackpot on the losing team. :)
Good theory, but no, he was just a little out of balance and was always like this. He was one of those guys you can see a mile away that he has low self-esteem.

He was an extreme case but millions of football fanatics get depressed or elated when there team wins and it's very obvious that they are attaching at least a portion of their own personal ego to the team they believe represents there own personal successes and failures. It's sad, because they let the accomplishments of others serve as proxies for their own self-worth - and in most case they don't have a fraction of the talent of the athletes they identify with.

It's like this with the Robbo and Houdini nut-cases too. Low self-esteem, and they attach their loyalties to a winner so that they can feel like a winner.
How about the Rybka nut-cases,I suppose this applies to them too....
Dr.D
_No one can hit as hard as life.But it ain’t about how hard you can hit.It’s about how hard you can get hit and keep moving forward.How much you can take and keep moving forward….

gerold
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Re: Houdini is getting some wider press. Congratulations!

Post by gerold » Mon Jan 17, 2011 3:00 pm

Don wrote:
gerold wrote:
Don wrote:
bhlangonijr wrote:
Don wrote: I just don't understand why people attach so much of their own self-worth to an achievement they had nothing to do with. Don't you have something of your own to take pride in?
This is an euphemism for: "Dude, get a life." :lol:

That phenomenon is an interesting side of the human nature. It is very often associated with some level of fanatism as commonly found in some fundamentalist religious people and also in football supporters.
It's odd that you mention football because I almost included an anecdote about this. Years ago an acquaintance of mine was depressed for about 2 weeks because his football team lost the super bowl. I just can't imagine how such a thing can mean so much to someone who seemed to take the loss as a personal failing on his own part. Had "his" team won he would have been flying high and probably would have felt like he was superior to everyone else for a couple of weeks.
May be he bet the family jackpot on the losing team. :)
Good theory, but no, he was just a little out of balance and was always like this. He was one of those guys you can see a mile away that he has low self-esteem.

He was an extreme case but millions of football fanatics get depressed or elated when there team wins and it's very obvious that they are attaching at least a portion of their own personal ego to the team they believe represents there own personal successes and failures. It's sad, because they let the accomplishments of others serve as proxies for their own self-worth - and in most case they don't have a fraction of the talent of the athletes they identify with.

It's like this with the Robbo and Houdini nut-cases too. Low self-esteem, and they attach their loyalties to a winner so that they can feel like a winner.
I just finished a long match between Houdini and the other 3 top
engines. If you throw out all the draws Houdini is 156 elo above
all other engines.

Best,
Gerold.

P.S. This is with Houdini playing without a book or TB.

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Don
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Re: Houdini is getting some wider press. Congratulations!

Post by Don » Mon Jan 17, 2011 4:09 pm

Dr.Wael Deeb wrote:
Don wrote:
gerold wrote:
Don wrote:
bhlangonijr wrote:
Don wrote: I just don't understand why people attach so much of their own self-worth to an achievement they had nothing to do with. Don't you have something of your own to take pride in?
This is an euphemism for: "Dude, get a life." :lol:

That phenomenon is an interesting side of the human nature. It is very often associated with some level of fanatism as commonly found in some fundamentalist religious people and also in football supporters.
It's odd that you mention football because I almost included an anecdote about this. Years ago an acquaintance of mine was depressed for about 2 weeks because his football team lost the super bowl. I just can't imagine how such a thing can mean so much to someone who seemed to take the loss as a personal failing on his own part. Had "his" team won he would have been flying high and probably would have felt like he was superior to everyone else for a couple of weeks.
May be he bet the family jackpot on the losing team. :)
Good theory, but no, he was just a little out of balance and was always like this. He was one of those guys you can see a mile away that he has low self-esteem.

He was an extreme case but millions of football fanatics get depressed or elated when there team wins and it's very obvious that they are attaching at least a portion of their own personal ego to the team they believe represents there own personal successes and failures. It's sad, because they let the accomplishments of others serve as proxies for their own self-worth - and in most case they don't have a fraction of the talent of the athletes they identify with.

It's like this with the Robbo and Houdini nut-cases too. Low self-esteem, and they attach their loyalties to a winner so that they can feel like a winner.
How about the Rybka nut-cases,I suppose this applies to them too....
Dr.D
Yes, it applies to them too. There are Rybka worshipers out there who have this same exact mentality. Even though they did not write the Rybka program they feel hurt when Houdini passes Rybka - as if it is a personal failing of theirs.

I think it's totally asinine when someone either gloats or feels "put down" by such immature comments when neither has any skill of their own.

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Dr.Wael Deeb
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Re: Houdini is getting some wider press. Congratulations!

Post by Dr.Wael Deeb » Mon Jan 17, 2011 5:11 pm

Don wrote:
Dr.Wael Deeb wrote:
Don wrote:
gerold wrote:
Don wrote:
bhlangonijr wrote:
Don wrote: I just don't understand why people attach so much of their own self-worth to an achievement they had nothing to do with. Don't you have something of your own to take pride in?
This is an euphemism for: "Dude, get a life." :lol:

That phenomenon is an interesting side of the human nature. It is very often associated with some level of fanatism as commonly found in some fundamentalist religious people and also in football supporters.
It's odd that you mention football because I almost included an anecdote about this. Years ago an acquaintance of mine was depressed for about 2 weeks because his football team lost the super bowl. I just can't imagine how such a thing can mean so much to someone who seemed to take the loss as a personal failing on his own part. Had "his" team won he would have been flying high and probably would have felt like he was superior to everyone else for a couple of weeks.
May be he bet the family jackpot on the losing team. :)
Good theory, but no, he was just a little out of balance and was always like this. He was one of those guys you can see a mile away that he has low self-esteem.

He was an extreme case but millions of football fanatics get depressed or elated when there team wins and it's very obvious that they are attaching at least a portion of their own personal ego to the team they believe represents there own personal successes and failures. It's sad, because they let the accomplishments of others serve as proxies for their own self-worth - and in most case they don't have a fraction of the talent of the athletes they identify with.

It's like this with the Robbo and Houdini nut-cases too. Low self-esteem, and they attach their loyalties to a winner so that they can feel like a winner.
How about the Rybka nut-cases,I suppose this applies to them too....
Dr.D
Yes, it applies to them too. There are Rybka worshipers out there who have this same exact mentality. Even though they did not write the Rybka program they feel hurt when Houdini passes Rybka - as if it is a personal failing of theirs.

I think it's totally asinine when someone either gloats or feels "put down" by such immature comments when neither has any skill of their own.
I totally agree here Don and that applies also for your football comments as I hate this sport almost as I hate Rybka :wink: ....
Dr.D
_No one can hit as hard as life.But it ain’t about how hard you can hit.It’s about how hard you can get hit and keep moving forward.How much you can take and keep moving forward….

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