A Komodo 10.3 win against Houdini 5.01

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TShackel
Posts: 313
Joined: Fri Apr 04, 2014 10:09 pm
Location: Neenah, WI, United States

A Komodo 10.3 win against Houdini 5.01

Post by TShackel » Tue Dec 27, 2016 3:39 pm

Hi,

Here's a win of Komodo in a caro-kann opening where white only usually gets a slight edge. Enjoy.

[pgn][Event "TIMSPC, Blitz 90m+20s"]
[Site "TimsPC"]
[Date "2016.12.26"]
[Round "1"]
[White "Komodo 10.3 64-bit"]
[Black "Houdini 5.01 x64-pext"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "B19"]
[Annotator "0.09;0.05"]
[PlyCount "165"]
[TimeControl "5400+20"]

{Intel(R) Core(TM) i7-4710HQ CPU @ 2.50GHz 2494 MHz W=36.1 plies; 4,334kN/s;
ShortLines.ctg B=28.9 plies; 5,913kN/s; ShortLines.ctg} 1. e4 {B 0} d5 {B 0}
2. d4 {B 0} c6 {B 0} 3. Nc3 {B 0} dxe4 {B 0} 4. Nxe4 {B 0} Bf5 {B 0} 5. Ng3 {
B 0} Bg6 {B 0} 6. h4 {B 0} h6 {B 0 Both last book move} 7. Nf3 {0.09/31 141}
Nd7 {0.05/26 206} 8. h5 {0.16/32 104 (Bd3)} Bh7 {-0.02/26 205} 9. Bd3 {0.00/32
104} Bxd3 {0.23/25 26} 10. Qxd3 {0.07/31 88} e6 {0.13/27 128} 11. Bd2 {0.10/32
144} Ngf6 {0.13/29 132} 12. O-O-O {0.10/32 277} Be7 {0.13/30 111 (a5)} 13. Ne4
{0.14/32 146 (Kb1)} Nxe4 {0.16/25 182} 14. Qxe4 {0.11/31 63} Nf6 {0.12/25 97}
15. Qd3 {0.20/32 136} O-O {0.12/27 107} 16. Ne5 {0.14/32 178} c5 {0.12/27 26}
17. dxc5 {0.13/31 117} Rc8 {0.12/29 110 (Qc7)} 18. Qxd8 {0.18/32 148 (Qe2)}
Rfxd8 {0.78/28 285} 19. b4 {0.55/32 148} Ne4 {0.98/27 226 (a5)} 20. Be3 {0.67/
33 72} a5 {0.95/26 38} 21. a3 {0.74/34 120} axb4 {0.90/29 160} 22. axb4 {0.79/
33 69} Bf6 {0.95/30 150} 23. Nc4 {0.89/35 137} Bc3 {0.98/27 36} 24. Rh4 {0.81/
36 140} f5 {1.00/30 133} 25. f3 {0.88/36 66} Ng3 {0.92/30 234} 26. Rd3 {0.92/
35 94} Rxd3 {1.11/29 178} 27. cxd3 {0.79/35 54} Bxb4 {1.08/30 147} 28. Nd6 {1.
05/36 141} Bxc5 {1.11/32 147} 29. Nxc8 {1.09/37 90} Bxe3+ {1.11/31 0} 30. Kd1 {
1.06/36 69} Bg5 {1.09/30 127 (Bf2)} 31. Rh3 {1.14/38 92} Bf4 {1.16/28 24} 32.
Nb6 {1.13/41 159 (Ke1)} Kf7 {1.00/30 91 (Kf8)} 33. d4 {1.13/42 119} Ke7 {1.12/
31 221} 34. Na4 {1.13/44 127 (Nc4)} Nf1 {1.06/30 105 (Kd6)} 35. Ke2 {1.07/34 57
} Ne3 {1.15/32 195} 36. Rh1 {1.26/38 139} b5 {1.19/31 150} 37. Nc3 {1.13/39 130
} b4 {1.17/30 19} 38. Na4 {1.13/39 104} Nxg2 {1.26/32 160} 39. Rg1 {1.18/38 107
} Ne3 {1.26/30 23} 40. Rxg7+ {1.34/37 93} Kf6 {1.10/31 145} 41. Rg6+ {1.37/37
117} Kf7 {1.10/30 0} 42. Rg1 {1.28/37 92 (Kd3)} Nd5 {1.29/31 351} 43. Kd3 {1.
41/37 82} e5 {1.31/30 101} 44. Ra1 {1.48/36 85} Bg3 {1.28/30 102} 45. Kc4 {1.
51/37 55} Ne3+ {1.22/28 15} 46. Kb3 {1.41/39 159} Nd5 {1.22/31 91} 47. Nc5 {1.
41/38 120} exd4 {1.22/32 43} 48. Ra7+ {1.41/41 115 (Ra6)} Kf6 {1.31/31 109} 49.
Ra6+ {1.41/40 42} Kg5 {1.31/29 18} 50. Rg6+ {1.41/41 65} Kh4 {1.32/31 97} 51.
Rxh6 {1.41/41 64} Nf4 {1.34/29 20} 52. Rh7 {1.75/42 284 (Rf6)} Bf2 {1.33/28 62}
53. Kc4 {1.78/41 133} Kg5 {1.34/31 101 (Be3)} 54. h6 {1.77/39 37} Be3 {1.35/29
11} 55. Rh8 {1.79/41 80} Ng6 {1.34/30 71} 56. Ne6+ {1.80/38 46} Kf6 {1.35/30 2}
57. Rb8 {1.84/39 60} Bxh6 {1.35/31 68} 58. Rb6 {1.85/39 43} Kf7 {1.35/30 34}
59. Nxd4 {1.86/40 80} Bf8 {1.35/30 59} 60. Nc6 {1.92/39 69} Bd6 {1.36/30 13}
61. Kd5 {1.97/39 63} Bg3 {1.42/30 71} 62. Nd8+ {1.98/37 60} Kg7 {1.42/30 0} 63.
Ne6+ {2.00/38 125 (Rxb4)} Kf7 {1.43/30 69} 64. Ng5+ {2.01/38 22} Kg7 {1.43/30 0
} 65. Rxb4 {2.03/40 53} Kf6 {1.54/31 87} 66. Nh3 {2.06/39 32} Ne7+ {1.62/31 83
(Bc7)} 67. Kc4 {2.23/38 148 (Kc5)} Kf7 {1.68/30 88 (Kg6)} 68. Rb7 {2.24/39 45
(Rb6)} Kf6 {2.10/34 354 (Be5)} 69. Ra7 {2.25/39 38 (Rb6+)} Bh2 {2.44/29 111}
70. Ra6+ {2.26/37 21} Kf7 {2.51/30 47} 71. Ng5+ {2.38/36 29 (Kd4)} Kg7 {2.44/
29 42 (Ke8)} 72. Ne6+ {2.43/36 33 (Kd4)} Kg6 {2.61/29 43} 73. Ra2 {2.75/37 89
(f4)} Bd6 {3.25/28 96} 74. Re2 {2.87/32 29} f4 {3.26/26 37 (Nc8)} 75. Nxf4+ {
3.03/31 17 (Nd4)} Kf7 {3.40/26 54} 76. Ne6 {3.45/33 111} Nf5 {3.54/27 35} 77.
Nd8+ {3.62/30 15 (Kd5)} Kg6 {3.54/25 19 (Kg8)} 78. Kd5 {4.42/30 58} Bb8 {4.00/
26 35 (Kh5)} 79. Re6+ {5.17/30 31} Kg5 {4.56/24 20 (Kh7)} 80. Nf7+ {7.18/27 13
(Re8)} Kh4 {10.27/25 20 (Kh5)} 81. Re8 {7.89/29 12} Ba7 {13.89/22 20} 82. f4 {
8.05/33 106 (Nd6)} Kg4 {12.16/23 20 (Ng3)} 83. Ke5 {11.63/38 15} 1-0[/pgn]

TShackel
Posts: 313
Joined: Fri Apr 04, 2014 10:09 pm
Location: Neenah, WI, United States

Re: A Komodo 10.3 win against Houdini 5.01

Post by TShackel » Tue Dec 27, 2016 9:38 pm

This is an even better win that just happened than the one above. What a fantastic crush of positional and tactical play.

[pgn][Event "TIMSPC, Blitz 90m+20s"]
[Site "TimsPC"]
[Date "2016.12.27"]
[Round "1"]
[White "Komodo 10.3 64-bit"]
[Black "Houdini 5.01 x64-pext"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "A84"]
[Annotator "0.62;0.65"]
[PlyCount "111"]
[TimeControl "5400+20"]

{Intel(R) Core(TM) i7-4710HQ CPU @ 2.50GHz 2494 MHz W=32.8 plies; 4,879kN/s;
ShortLines.ctg B=25.3 plies; 6,151kN/s; ShortLines.ctg} 1. d4 {B 0} d5 {B 0}
2. c4 {B 0} e6 {B 0} 3. Nf3 {B 0} c6 {B 0} 4. Nc3 {B 0} f5 {B 0} 5. Bf4 {B 0}
Nf6 {B 0} 6. e3 {B 0} Be7 {B 0 Both last book move} 7. Bd3 {0.62/29 133} Ne4 {
0.65/26 397 (Nh5)} 8. h3 {0.58/32 180} O-O {0.71/27 457 (Nd7)} 9. O-O {0.57/31
177} Nd7 {0.76/26 185} 10. Qc2 {0.58/30 153 (Rc1)} Bf6 {0.74/24 132} 11. a3 {
0.59/30 165} Nb6 {0.70/24 182 (Qe7)} 12. b3 {0.51/29 113} Qe7 {0.70/24 223} 13.
Bh2 {0.57/29 204} Re8 {0.68/23 100 (Rd8)} 14. Rab1 {0.61/30 253 (Ne2)} Rd8 {0.
75/24 135 (Nd7)} 15. Rfd1 {0.68/30 174} g6 {0.82/25 177 (Nd7)} 16. b4 {0.66/29
76 (Ne2)} Nxc4 {0.94/25 232 (Re8)} 17. Bxc4 {0.88/32 77} dxc4 {1.06/27 159} 18.
Nxe4 {0.73/33 59} fxe4 {1.11/29 0} 19. Nd2 {0.80/36 168 (Ne5)} b5 {0.90/26 58}
20. Nxe4 {0.83/36 149} Rd5 {1.05/27 441 (Bg7)} 21. Qb2 {0.88/36 226 (Nxf6+)}
Qd8 {1.07/27 99 (Bb7)} 22. Bc7 {0.89/34 113 (Nxf6+)} Qf8 {1.13/27 344 (Qe7)}
23. Nc5 {0.91/36 373} Qf7 {1.16/26 132} 24. Be5 {0.91/35 51} Be7 {1.22/28 167
(Rd8)} 25. Ra1 {1.13/35 171 (e4)} a6 {1.13/24 64 (Rd8)} 26. e4 {1.36/34 215
(Qc3)} Rd8 {1.12/27 96} 27. a4 {1.31/31 48} Ra7 {1.19/23 22 (h6)} 28. axb5 {1.
50/32 113 (f4)} cxb5 {1.15/25 88} 29. Ra3 {1.58/32 69} Bd6 {1.60/27 411} 30. d5
{1.70/31 90} Qf8 {1.37/26 74 (Bxe5)} 31. Rf3 {2.11/32 68} Rf7 {2.57/28 235} 32.
Rxf7 {2.01/33 79 (dxe6)} Kxf7 {1.66/26 47} 33. Bxd6 {2.26/34 102 (Qd4)} Rxd6 {
1.99/26 169} 34. Qe5 {2.23/33 54} Kg8 {2.17/24 14} 35. f4 {2.38/31 50} h6 {2.
17/27 243 (h5)} 36. Kh2 {2.38/31 70 (g4)} Qd8 {1.84/24 38 (Kh7)} 37. Re1 {2.77/
35 73} exd5 {2.55/30 459} 38. exd5 {2.74/36 61} Rxd5 {2.64/28 231 (Rf6)} 39.
Qe8+ {3.10/32 55} Qxe8 {2.80/25 71} 40. Rxe8+ {3.47/32 76} Kf7 {2.83/25 6} 41.
Rxc8 {3.55/32 47} Rd6 {2.73/28 26 (Rf5)} 42. Kg3 {3.63/33 67} c3 {2.85/26 72}
43. Kf2 {3.80/34 100 (Rc7+)} Rd2+ {2.85/24 50} 44. Kf3 {4.18/32 115} c2 {3.13/
26 65} 45. Rc7+ {4.60/32 49} Ke8 {3.10/23 8 (Kg8)} 46. Ne6 {4.78/32 37} Rd6 {
3.29/25 45 (a5)} 47. Rxc2 {5.97/32 78 (f5)} Ke7 {5.25/25 125} 48. Nc5 {6.26/33
67} g5 {5.36/24 31} 49. Re2+ {6.92/33 102 (fxg5)} Kf7 {5.76/24 36} 50. fxg5 {
7.85/35 189} hxg5 {5.79/20 3} 51. Re5 {8.02/34 60} Rf6+ {6.03/24 60 (Rd1)} 52.
Kg3 {8.22/34 50} Rf4 {6.35/24 31 (Rg6)} 53. Nxa6 {10.31/36 78} Rd4 {6.98/23 20}
54. Rxg5 {10.37/38 297} Rd3+ {7.62/21 20 (Rd7)} 55. Kh4 {14.87/34 43 (Kg4)} Rd6
{8.07/24 20} 56. Nc7 {22.39/36 43} 1-0[/pgn]

Lyudmil Tsvetkov
Posts: 6052
Joined: Tue Jun 12, 2012 10:41 am

Re: A Komodo 10.3 win against Houdini 5.01

Post by Lyudmil Tsvetkov » Wed Dec 28, 2016 11:12 am

TShackel wrote:This is an even better win that just happened than the one above. What a fantastic crush of positional and tactical play.

[pgn][Event "TIMSPC, Blitz 90m+20s"]
[Site "TimsPC"]
[Date "2016.12.27"]
[Round "1"]
[White "Komodo 10.3 64-bit"]
[Black "Houdini 5.01 x64-pext"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "A84"]
[Annotator "0.62;0.65"]
[PlyCount "111"]
[TimeControl "5400+20"]

{Intel(R) Core(TM) i7-4710HQ CPU @ 2.50GHz 2494 MHz W=32.8 plies; 4,879kN/s;
ShortLines.ctg B=25.3 plies; 6,151kN/s; ShortLines.ctg} 1. d4 {B 0} d5 {B 0}
2. c4 {B 0} e6 {B 0} 3. Nf3 {B 0} c6 {B 0} 4. Nc3 {B 0} f5 {B 0} 5. Bf4 {B 0}
Nf6 {B 0} 6. e3 {B 0} Be7 {B 0 Both last book move} 7. Bd3 {0.62/29 133} Ne4 {
0.65/26 397 (Nh5)} 8. h3 {0.58/32 180} O-O {0.71/27 457 (Nd7)} 9. O-O {0.57/31
177} Nd7 {0.76/26 185} 10. Qc2 {0.58/30 153 (Rc1)} Bf6 {0.74/24 132} 11. a3 {
0.59/30 165} Nb6 {0.70/24 182 (Qe7)} 12. b3 {0.51/29 113} Qe7 {0.70/24 223} 13.
Bh2 {0.57/29 204} Re8 {0.68/23 100 (Rd8)} 14. Rab1 {0.61/30 253 (Ne2)} Rd8 {0.
75/24 135 (Nd7)} 15. Rfd1 {0.68/30 174} g6 {0.82/25 177 (Nd7)} 16. b4 {0.66/29
76 (Ne2)} Nxc4 {0.94/25 232 (Re8)} 17. Bxc4 {0.88/32 77} dxc4 {1.06/27 159} 18.
Nxe4 {0.73/33 59} fxe4 {1.11/29 0} 19. Nd2 {0.80/36 168 (Ne5)} b5 {0.90/26 58}
20. Nxe4 {0.83/36 149} Rd5 {1.05/27 441 (Bg7)} 21. Qb2 {0.88/36 226 (Nxf6+)}
Qd8 {1.07/27 99 (Bb7)} 22. Bc7 {0.89/34 113 (Nxf6+)} Qf8 {1.13/27 344 (Qe7)}
23. Nc5 {0.91/36 373} Qf7 {1.16/26 132} 24. Be5 {0.91/35 51} Be7 {1.22/28 167
(Rd8)} 25. Ra1 {1.13/35 171 (e4)} a6 {1.13/24 64 (Rd8)} 26. e4 {1.36/34 215
(Qc3)} Rd8 {1.12/27 96} 27. a4 {1.31/31 48} Ra7 {1.19/23 22 (h6)} 28. axb5 {1.
50/32 113 (f4)} cxb5 {1.15/25 88} 29. Ra3 {1.58/32 69} Bd6 {1.60/27 411} 30. d5
{1.70/31 90} Qf8 {1.37/26 74 (Bxe5)} 31. Rf3 {2.11/32 68} Rf7 {2.57/28 235} 32.
Rxf7 {2.01/33 79 (dxe6)} Kxf7 {1.66/26 47} 33. Bxd6 {2.26/34 102 (Qd4)} Rxd6 {
1.99/26 169} 34. Qe5 {2.23/33 54} Kg8 {2.17/24 14} 35. f4 {2.38/31 50} h6 {2.
17/27 243 (h5)} 36. Kh2 {2.38/31 70 (g4)} Qd8 {1.84/24 38 (Kh7)} 37. Re1 {2.77/
35 73} exd5 {2.55/30 459} 38. exd5 {2.74/36 61} Rxd5 {2.64/28 231 (Rf6)} 39.
Qe8+ {3.10/32 55} Qxe8 {2.80/25 71} 40. Rxe8+ {3.47/32 76} Kf7 {2.83/25 6} 41.
Rxc8 {3.55/32 47} Rd6 {2.73/28 26 (Rf5)} 42. Kg3 {3.63/33 67} c3 {2.85/26 72}
43. Kf2 {3.80/34 100 (Rc7+)} Rd2+ {2.85/24 50} 44. Kf3 {4.18/32 115} c2 {3.13/
26 65} 45. Rc7+ {4.60/32 49} Ke8 {3.10/23 8 (Kg8)} 46. Ne6 {4.78/32 37} Rd6 {
3.29/25 45 (a5)} 47. Rxc2 {5.97/32 78 (f5)} Ke7 {5.25/25 125} 48. Nc5 {6.26/33
67} g5 {5.36/24 31} 49. Re2+ {6.92/33 102 (fxg5)} Kf7 {5.76/24 36} 50. fxg5 {
7.85/35 189} hxg5 {5.79/20 3} 51. Re5 {8.02/34 60} Rf6+ {6.03/24 60 (Rd1)} 52.
Kg3 {8.22/34 50} Rf4 {6.35/24 31 (Rg6)} 53. Nxa6 {10.31/36 78} Rd4 {6.98/23 20}
54. Rxg5 {10.37/38 297} Rd3+ {7.62/21 20 (Rd7)} 55. Kh4 {14.87/34 43 (Kg4)} Rd6
{8.07/24 20} 56. Nc7 {22.39/36 43} 1-0[/pgn]
a fully equal position that both engines evaluate as already losing for black. (+60-70cps)

H went astray with Nd7 and especially dc4, which seems to be suicidal. in the Dutch Stonewall, black should keep to the stonewall structure, and the rigth continuation is 9...g5, followed by h5, Kh7, Rg8, g4, etc., with very strong black kingside attack; black has at least an equality.

another option is to just hold onto the draw by placing all black pawns on white squares, defending aech other and doing nothing.

Lyudmil Tsvetkov
Posts: 6052
Joined: Tue Jun 12, 2012 10:41 am

Re: A Komodo 10.3 win against Houdini 5.01

Post by Lyudmil Tsvetkov » Wed Dec 28, 2016 11:37 am

TShackel wrote:Hi,

Here's a win of Komodo in a caro-kann opening where white only usually gets a slight edge. Enjoy.

[pgn][Event "TIMSPC, Blitz 90m+20s"]
[Site "TimsPC"]
[Date "2016.12.26"]
[Round "1"]
[White "Komodo 10.3 64-bit"]
[Black "Houdini 5.01 x64-pext"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "B19"]
[Annotator "0.09;0.05"]
[PlyCount "165"]
[TimeControl "5400+20"]

{Intel(R) Core(TM) i7-4710HQ CPU @ 2.50GHz 2494 MHz W=36.1 plies; 4,334kN/s;
ShortLines.ctg B=28.9 plies; 5,913kN/s; ShortLines.ctg} 1. e4 {B 0} d5 {B 0}
2. d4 {B 0} c6 {B 0} 3. Nc3 {B 0} dxe4 {B 0} 4. Nxe4 {B 0} Bf5 {B 0} 5. Ng3 {
B 0} Bg6 {B 0} 6. h4 {B 0} h6 {B 0 Both last book move} 7. Nf3 {0.09/31 141}
Nd7 {0.05/26 206} 8. h5 {0.16/32 104 (Bd3)} Bh7 {-0.02/26 205} 9. Bd3 {0.00/32
104} Bxd3 {0.23/25 26} 10. Qxd3 {0.07/31 88} e6 {0.13/27 128} 11. Bd2 {0.10/32
144} Ngf6 {0.13/29 132} 12. O-O-O {0.10/32 277} Be7 {0.13/30 111 (a5)} 13. Ne4
{0.14/32 146 (Kb1)} Nxe4 {0.16/25 182} 14. Qxe4 {0.11/31 63} Nf6 {0.12/25 97}
15. Qd3 {0.20/32 136} O-O {0.12/27 107} 16. Ne5 {0.14/32 178} c5 {0.12/27 26}
17. dxc5 {0.13/31 117} Rc8 {0.12/29 110 (Qc7)} 18. Qxd8 {0.18/32 148 (Qe2)}
Rfxd8 {0.78/28 285} 19. b4 {0.55/32 148} Ne4 {0.98/27 226 (a5)} 20. Be3 {0.67/
33 72} a5 {0.95/26 38} 21. a3 {0.74/34 120} axb4 {0.90/29 160} 22. axb4 {0.79/
33 69} Bf6 {0.95/30 150} 23. Nc4 {0.89/35 137} Bc3 {0.98/27 36} 24. Rh4 {0.81/
36 140} f5 {1.00/30 133} 25. f3 {0.88/36 66} Ng3 {0.92/30 234} 26. Rd3 {0.92/
35 94} Rxd3 {1.11/29 178} 27. cxd3 {0.79/35 54} Bxb4 {1.08/30 147} 28. Nd6 {1.
05/36 141} Bxc5 {1.11/32 147} 29. Nxc8 {1.09/37 90} Bxe3+ {1.11/31 0} 30. Kd1 {
1.06/36 69} Bg5 {1.09/30 127 (Bf2)} 31. Rh3 {1.14/38 92} Bf4 {1.16/28 24} 32.
Nb6 {1.13/41 159 (Ke1)} Kf7 {1.00/30 91 (Kf8)} 33. d4 {1.13/42 119} Ke7 {1.12/
31 221} 34. Na4 {1.13/44 127 (Nc4)} Nf1 {1.06/30 105 (Kd6)} 35. Ke2 {1.07/34 57
} Ne3 {1.15/32 195} 36. Rh1 {1.26/38 139} b5 {1.19/31 150} 37. Nc3 {1.13/39 130
} b4 {1.17/30 19} 38. Na4 {1.13/39 104} Nxg2 {1.26/32 160} 39. Rg1 {1.18/38 107
} Ne3 {1.26/30 23} 40. Rxg7+ {1.34/37 93} Kf6 {1.10/31 145} 41. Rg6+ {1.37/37
117} Kf7 {1.10/30 0} 42. Rg1 {1.28/37 92 (Kd3)} Nd5 {1.29/31 351} 43. Kd3 {1.
41/37 82} e5 {1.31/30 101} 44. Ra1 {1.48/36 85} Bg3 {1.28/30 102} 45. Kc4 {1.
51/37 55} Ne3+ {1.22/28 15} 46. Kb3 {1.41/39 159} Nd5 {1.22/31 91} 47. Nc5 {1.
41/38 120} exd4 {1.22/32 43} 48. Ra7+ {1.41/41 115 (Ra6)} Kf6 {1.31/31 109} 49.
Ra6+ {1.41/40 42} Kg5 {1.31/29 18} 50. Rg6+ {1.41/41 65} Kh4 {1.32/31 97} 51.
Rxh6 {1.41/41 64} Nf4 {1.34/29 20} 52. Rh7 {1.75/42 284 (Rf6)} Bf2 {1.33/28 62}
53. Kc4 {1.78/41 133} Kg5 {1.34/31 101 (Be3)} 54. h6 {1.77/39 37} Be3 {1.35/29
11} 55. Rh8 {1.79/41 80} Ng6 {1.34/30 71} 56. Ne6+ {1.80/38 46} Kf6 {1.35/30 2}
57. Rb8 {1.84/39 60} Bxh6 {1.35/31 68} 58. Rb6 {1.85/39 43} Kf7 {1.35/30 34}
59. Nxd4 {1.86/40 80} Bf8 {1.35/30 59} 60. Nc6 {1.92/39 69} Bd6 {1.36/30 13}
61. Kd5 {1.97/39 63} Bg3 {1.42/30 71} 62. Nd8+ {1.98/37 60} Kg7 {1.42/30 0} 63.
Ne6+ {2.00/38 125 (Rxb4)} Kf7 {1.43/30 69} 64. Ng5+ {2.01/38 22} Kg7 {1.43/30 0
} 65. Rxb4 {2.03/40 53} Kf6 {1.54/31 87} 66. Nh3 {2.06/39 32} Ne7+ {1.62/31 83
(Bc7)} 67. Kc4 {2.23/38 148 (Kc5)} Kf7 {1.68/30 88 (Kg6)} 68. Rb7 {2.24/39 45
(Rb6)} Kf6 {2.10/34 354 (Be5)} 69. Ra7 {2.25/39 38 (Rb6+)} Bh2 {2.44/29 111}
70. Ra6+ {2.26/37 21} Kf7 {2.51/30 47} 71. Ng5+ {2.38/36 29 (Kd4)} Kg7 {2.44/
29 42 (Ke8)} 72. Ne6+ {2.43/36 33 (Kd4)} Kg6 {2.61/29 43} 73. Ra2 {2.75/37 89
(f4)} Bd6 {3.25/28 96} 74. Re2 {2.87/32 29} f4 {3.26/26 37 (Nc8)} 75. Nxf4+ {
3.03/31 17 (Nd4)} Kf7 {3.40/26 54} 76. Ne6 {3.45/33 111} Nf5 {3.54/27 35} 77.
Nd8+ {3.62/30 15 (Kd5)} Kg6 {3.54/25 19 (Kg8)} 78. Kd5 {4.42/30 58} Bb8 {4.00/
26 35 (Kh5)} 79. Re6+ {5.17/30 31} Kg5 {4.56/24 20 (Kh7)} 80. Nf7+ {7.18/27 13
(Re8)} Kh4 {10.27/25 20 (Kh5)} 81. Re8 {7.89/29 12} Ba7 {13.89/22 20} 82. f4 {
8.05/33 106 (Nd6)} Kg4 {12.16/23 20 (Ng3)} 83. Ke5 {11.63/38 15} 1-0[/pgn]
it is not that easy to play the Caro-Kann with black; white already has the advantage of the first move + black makes with c6 only the 3rd or 4th best of the possible replies to 1.e4.

I guess white has bigger advantage than what the engines show, at least I have difficult time to fully equalise with black against engines here, although the position seems too symmetrical and a bit drawish.

quite possibly, c6-c5 was the major mistake, however, the books I have read on the line pointed specifically that, even if black mades it into the endgame, white has significant advantage.

This game did not strike me as particularly deserving of attention, however, the second one was really a nice positional example.

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Re: A Komodo 10.3 win against Houdini 5.01

Post by Guenther » Wed Dec 28, 2016 11:39 am

Lyudmil Tsvetkov wrote: a fully equal position that both engines evaluate as already losing for black. (+60-70cps)

Code: Select all

8. h3 0.58/32 9. O-O 0.57/31 10. Qc2 0.58/30 11. a3 0.59/30 12. b3 0.51/29
1. 0.60 something eval by chess programs is not winning/losing at least in our universe.

2. The numbers even say otherwise for White between moves 8-12

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Re: A Komodo 10.3 win against Houdini 5.01

Post by Lyudmil Tsvetkov » Wed Dec 28, 2016 11:40 am

btw., in the hurry I did not see that black answered 1.e4 with d5.

why did not white capture on d5? (the Scandinavian is almost certainly a bust, at least 85% of lines)

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Re: A Komodo 10.3 win against Houdini 5.01

Post by Lyudmil Tsvetkov » Wed Dec 28, 2016 11:43 am

Guenther wrote:
Lyudmil Tsvetkov wrote: a fully equal position that both engines evaluate as already losing for black. (+60-70cps)

Code: Select all

8. h3 0.58/32 9. O-O 0.57/31 10. Qc2 0.58/30 11. a3 0.59/30 12. b3 0.51/29
1. 0.60 something eval by chess programs is not winning/losing at least in our universe.

2. The numbers even say otherwise for White between moves 8-12
I guess you live in another universe.
in the chess universe I live, 65 cps, objective score, in the mg, is simply lost. of course, engines do not have perfect objective evals.

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Re: A Komodo 10.3 win against Houdini 5.01

Post by Guenther » Wed Dec 28, 2016 11:56 am

Lyudmil Tsvetkov wrote:
Guenther wrote:
Lyudmil Tsvetkov wrote: a fully equal position that both engines evaluate as already losing for black. (+60-70cps)

Code: Select all

8. h3 0.58/32 9. O-O 0.57/31 10. Qc2 0.58/30 11. a3 0.59/30 12. b3 0.51/29
1. 0.60 something eval by chess programs is not winning/losing at least in our universe.

2. The numbers even say otherwise for White between moves 8-12
I guess you live in another universe.
in the chess universe I live, 65 cps, objective score, in the mg, is simply lost. of course, engines do not have perfect objective evals.
1. There is overwhelming evidence in thousands of posts that your universe is not driven by something which slightly resembles logic.

2. It is even possible in your universe that 0.5x > 0.6x (qed quote 2).

3. By no known chess definition we are in the middlegame for the quoted game in move 8+ something.

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Re: A Komodo 10.3 win against Houdini 5.01

Post by TShackel » Wed Dec 28, 2016 4:25 pm

Lyudmil Tsvetkov wrote:a fully equal position that both engines evaluate as already losing for black. (+60-70cps)

H went astray with Nd7 and especially dc4, which seems to be suicidal. in the Dutch Stonewall, black should keep to the stonewall structure, and the rigth continuation is 9...g5, followed by h5, Kh7, Rg8, g4, etc., with very strong black kingside attack; black has at least an equality.

another option is to just hold onto the draw by placing all black pawns on white squares, defending aech other and doing nothing.
You can't call that position fully equal in the slightest, one reason being that both white bishops are in good locations, and black's c8 bishop is buried. That's one reason already white is definitely better. That's why the move 21. Qb2! was so strong to grapple on to the e5 quare and prepare Be5, because if e5 is blocked that bishop at c8 stays buried. Very strong positional play by komodo. 16...Nxc4? was not good also.

Regarding your line with 9...g5 10. Bh2 do you play 10...h5? now? That's bad because of Ne5 attacking g6 square, and black's development is lagging since he didn't play Nd7, and white is completely winning. after 9...g5 Bh2 better is 10...Nd7 is obvious developing move, and white has several choices at move 11, being Ne2, Rc1 and Komodo even looked at 11. Kh1! here just sidestepping any attack and giving a high white score, I'm not worried about the attack at all. All I have to do is keep my eye on buried c8 bishop and lack of black attackers to white defenders on KS to know white has great advantage.

To sum up, white definitely had advantage in that opening and Komodo's eval was right.

Sincerely,

Tim.

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Re: A Komodo 10.3 win against Houdini 5.01

Post by TShackel » Wed Dec 28, 2016 4:33 pm

Lyudmil Tsvetkov wrote:it is not that easy to play the Caro-Kann with black; white already has the advantage of the first move + black makes with c6 only the 3rd or 4th best of the possible replies to 1.e4.

I guess white has bigger advantage than what the engines show, at least I have difficult time to fully equalise with black against engines here, although the position seems too symmetrical and a bit drawish.

quite possibly, c6-c5 was the major mistake, however, the books I have read on the line pointed specifically that, even if black mades it into the endgame, white has significant advantage.

This game did not strike me as particularly deserving of attention, however, the second one was really a nice positional example.
1...c6 is a perfectly solid system, being better than theh french defense becaue it doesn't bury the c8 bishop. White usually get slight edges,

C6-c5 was book move, and after dxc5 Rc8?! was the mistake, better is Qc7 or taking the pawn immediately with Bxc5 to avoid the grapple of the extra pawn with b4.

I agree this game wasn't particularly exciting, but it was the first decisive result in my match so I posted it. The second one however was sgtrategically rich and exciting.

Oh and regarding 1. e4 d5 3. d4 c6 I was using the Shortlines.ctg book by Jerome Noomen. I've made my own short books as well that would never have played 1...d5, but I respect Jerome Noomen's short book to allow engines to play more for themselves. So blame Jerome for that move. :)

Sincerely,

Tim.

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