What is the longest game ever played in Correspondence in ICCF Championship?

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Chessqueen
Posts: 581
Joined: Wed Sep 05, 2018 12:16 am
Full name: Nancy M Pichardo

What is the longest game ever played in Correspondence in ICCF Championship?

Post by Chessqueen » Sun Jan 06, 2019 4:44 pm

1. what is the longest game ever played in term of months and number of moves in a world correspondence Championship?
2. Can the World correspondence chess champion Aleksandr Dronov beat the best computer program in a correspondence game? what are his chances?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aleksandr_Dronov

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_Cor ... ampionship

Chessqueen
Posts: 581
Joined: Wed Sep 05, 2018 12:16 am
Full name: Nancy M Pichardo

Re: What is the longest game ever played in Correspondence in ICCF Championship?

Post by Chessqueen » Sun Jan 06, 2019 9:38 pm

Chessqueen wrote:
Sun Jan 06, 2019 4:44 pm
1. what is the longest game ever played in term of months and number of moves in a world correspondence Championship?
2. Can the World correspondence chess champion Aleksandr Dronov beat the best computer program in a correspondence game? what are his chances?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aleksandr_Dronov
I found this on google, but that was back in 2005, considering the advancement in computer programming technique and a 8x times faster PC than what was available back in 2005, I really do NOT know if a Computer with the latest chess software like Komodo can draw or even win versus Aleksand Dronov. So, while it is true that the average human player would have little chance against an equal human playing with a computer, it is also true that computers have little chance playing against an equal computer playing with a human. All of which suggests that humans still contribute to the game, even when computers are involved.


This is what I found and I copied it and paste it here.

"First, back in 2005, Arno Nickel, one of the strongest correspondence chess players in the world, played a four-game match with Hydra, which at the time was arguably the strongest chess-playing supercomputer in the world. Nickel was allowed to use a PC and chess software that he had bought off the shelf, similar to what he would use in an ICCF tournament. In a straight-up match between Hydra and the basic PC software, Hydra would have won every game. In the actual match, the match ended early because Nickel crushed Hydra 2.5-0.5 (two wins and one draw for Nickel). In other words, the combination of man and weak machine was too much for the best super-computer on the planet.

Second, there is a variant of chess called Centaur chess. Centaur chess involves a human-computer team. Humans make the move, taking into account analysis by the computer. At first glance, one would expect that this is simply a matter of who has the best computer software (and many of the players have developed their own chess programs). However, Centaur tournaments allow participation not just by human-computer teams, but by stand-alone computers without human assistance, and usually about half the participants are such stand-alone computers. To my knowledge, every one of these tournaments has been won by a centaur, i.e. the human-computer teams always beat the computers. "

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